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The Ezra Home Care Blog

Ezra Home Care's Favorite Healthy January Recipe

Jan 4, 2013 |
Posted by Jessica Zelfand |

roasted root jumble   Ezra Home Care%27s Favorite recipe for January resized 600

Ezra Home Care's favorite January recipe: Roasted Root Jumble with Feta Cheese!

We love sharing healthy and delicious recipes. "Dietary choices are critical to delay the onset of aging and age-related diseases, and the sooner you start, the greater the benefit," says Susan Moores, RD, a spokesman for the American Dietetic Association."

Enjoy the Roasted Root Jumble with Feta Cheese!

Total Time: 1 hr 0 min
Prep: 15 min
Cook: 45 min
Yield: 4 to 6 servings
Level: Easy

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons ground *coriander
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 large fennel bulb, cut into 1/2-inch wedges
  • 1 large red onion, cut into 1/2-inch wedges
  • 1 large lemon, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch rounds
  • 1/2 cup feta cheese, crumbled
  • Minced fresh cilantro or parsley, to garnish

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

In a small bowl, whisk together the ground cumin, ground coriander, and olive oil. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and a generous grinding of black pepper.

Lay the fennel, red onions, lemons, and carrots in a baking dish. Pour the spiced oil over the vegetables and toss to coat. Bake for 30 minutes. Sprinkle feta cheese over the top and bake until the vegetables are caramelized and soft, another 15 minutes.

 

coriander

Pronunciation: [KOR-ee-an-der]

This description was taken from the Food Network

Native to the Mediterranean and the Orient, coriander is related to the parsley family. It's known for both its seeds (actually the dried, ripe fruit of the plant) and for its dark green, lacy leaves (cilantro). The flavors of the seeds and leaves bear absolutely no resemblance to each other. Mention of coriander seeds was found in early Sanskrit writings, and the seeds themselves have been discovered in Egyptian tombs dating to 960 B.C. The tiny (1⁄8-inch) yellow-tan seeds are lightly ridged. They are mildly fragrant and have an aromatic flavor akin to a combination of lemon, sage and caraway. Whole coriander seeds are used in pickling and for special drinks, such as mulled wine. Ground seed is used in many baked goods (particularly Scandinavian), curry blends, soups, etc. Both forms are commonly available in supermarkets. Coriander leaves are commonly known as cilantro and Chinese parsley. They have an extremely pungent (some say fetid) odor and flavor that lends itself well to highly seasoned food. Though it's purported to be the world's most widely used herb, many Americans and Europeans find that fresh coriander is definitely an acquired taste. Choose leaves with an even green color and no sign of wilting. Store a bunch of coriander, stems down, in a glass of water with a plastic bag over the leaves. Refrigerate in this manner for up to a week, changing the water every two days. Coriander leaves are used widely in the cuisines of India, Mexico, the Orient and the Caribbean.

TAGS: Heart Condition Care Elder Care

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Jessica Zelfand

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